social media

Brand blowups: Is it actual outrage - or boomerang outrage?

Brand blowups: Is it actual outrage - or boomerang outrage?

Starbucks’ ‘red cup controversy’ is a prime example of a brand blowup that looks like a mess on the surface, but is actually a blessing in disguise. When things go wrong in the twittersphere and your brand is the headline item on the news, know when to distinguish between outrage and outrage-at-outrage.

Response to bombing highlights crowd sourcing and literate social media

Response to bombing highlights crowd sourcing and literate social media

The bomb blast at a shrine in central Bangkok on 17 August, which took the lives of more than 20 people and injured more than 100, shocked not only Thais but people around the world. It is notable that very few people posted or shared violent and grisly images. This phenomenon was interesting as it is a sign of growing maturity in the use of social media.  I call it “literate social media.”  

How western businesses can succeed with Chinese social media

How western businesses can succeed with Chinese social media

Social media plays a far more important role in the daily life of Chinese people than it does in the West, and the way social platforms work is also very different. Companies and individuals charge for followers, social e-commerce is widespread and trust in a brand is based on whether you read about it on the subway to work. For new brands and businesses entering the China market, it’s essential to know these platforms and how they can add value to your business.